Pumpkin Chai Smoothie

Here's a throwback post that is certainly appropriate for this October weekend.  This smoothie matches the season and will be a great way to start the lovely fall day. Thanks to Smoothie Queen Amy for this great recipe I can't wait Read more

Gluten Free Zucchini Bread

Gluten-Free Zucchini Bread So I have been struggling with gluten-free baking because honestly -- I've never been good at baking!!  Then when I try to modify recipes using flours I'm not familiar with, it just makes  a perfect storm of Read more

When Should I Take My Supplements?

If you are like me -- you are just starting to realize why it is important to add supplements to your diet.  Even if we are eating a clean, healthy and unprocessed diet;  the mineral content of the soil Read more

Magnesium-the unloved mineral

Do you remember watching Wild Kingdom as a kid?  Did you happen to notice that the animals attacking their prey would immediately eat the organ meats.  I never really thought about why until I listened to Morley Robbins explain the Read more

More Homemade Salad Dressings

Blackberry Balsamic Vinaigrette 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp local honey 1/3 cup blackberries   Process all the ingredients together in a blender and then season with ground pepper and sea salt The beauty of this recipe Read more

Healthy Mayo and Ranch Dressing

This stuff is a must -- If you read labels these days you will be hard pressed to find a mayonnaise or salad dressing that doesn't contain some type of vegetable oil.  Even the commercial mayos that advertise to Read more

Sherry's Story

Sherry has a great story.  She has been diabetic for years and she has made some massive changes!   "I have been on a lifestyle change. It has been a year following a ketogenic food plan.  When I started this journey Read more

Tara's Story

Tara's Story When I turned 30 years old I weighed in at 348lbs; clothes were getting harder to find and more expensive, and my life was getting difficult to manage. When going out to eat we had to have a Read more

additives

Health Concerns of High Fructose Corn Syrup

High Fructose Corn Syrup—most of us are aware by now that we should avoid this when we are reading our grocery store labels.  Lately, I have been shocked at how many proclaimed “healthy” products actually contain it.  I thought I would share just a few more health risks associated with regular consumption of these products.

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I would like to share a brief excerpt from my favorite book “Bring Back Vitality” by Bea White and Lori Petrucciani ND

 

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Health Concerns if HFCS

1/3 of products that contain HFCS also contain mercury

HFCS is 45 % glucose which is more quickly absorbed but the body than sugar, causing a blood sugar spike.  This can lead to insulin resistance and diabetes

Weigh gain and obesity:  A 2010 Princeton University study found that high fructose corn syrup caused significantly more weight gain than regular sugar

Liver stress

Fat cell accumulation

Inflammation

High Blood Pressure

High lipid cholesterol

Alzheimer’s Disease

Type 2 Diabetes

This excerpt is from page 160 of this fabulous guide-book Bring Back Vitality —which is available for purchase on the store page of this WEBSITE

1463332_479461622169020_124370057_nAlso learn more by visiting their SITE.  Hats off to these two wellness warriors that took it upon themselves to write such an understandable guideline and handbook to overall wellness using Food As Medicine!

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Fooducate

In this world of technology overload, I have found a positive to my smart phone that is quite helpful.  FOODUCATE is a fabulous app for all our wellness patients and website followers to use.  Here is a little information about this app and how/why to get started using it.  It not only grades nutritional content of the items at the grocery store, it allows you to scan the barcode and get the information right on your phone.  Then you can search for alternative, healthier options based on their suggestions.  It’s ingenious!  Why didn’t I think of this first?

 http://www.fooducate.com/

Get the Fooducate mobile application and use it to:

  • Automatically scan a product barcode
  • See product highlights (both good & bad)
  • Compare products
  • Select better alternatives
  • Dig deeper and learn more about food and nutrition

Features:

  • Created by dietitians and concerned parents
  • Uses your mobile’s camera to effortlessly scan UPC barcode
  • Over 200,000 unique products and growing daily
  • Simplified information helps you make better choices
  • Works on iPhone, iPod touch, iPad and Android OS version 2.2 and up

This is what is nice about this app

You get to see the stuff manufacturers don’t want you to notice, such as

  • excessive sugar
  • tricky trans fats
  • additives and preservatives
  • high fructose corn syrup
  • controversial food colorings
  • confusing serving sizes
  • and more…

Read the labels or let fooducate do it for you.  And remember, eat your veggies people.  Eat your veggies!

 

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition, vegan, Weight Loss, Whole Food 2 Comments

Buzzwords

Here is a little information regarding the buzzwords on labels that you might find interesting.  I had no idea the difference between some of these different labels and just assumed that if it said cage-free or all natural –it was a good product to buy.  Wow–I did make an ass out of you and me on that one.

1.  Cage-Free

There is no legal definition of this term.  If hens are labeled cage-free, the do have more space than caged hens but they can still be crammed inside barns or houses etc.  It also doesn’t tell us anything about the hen’s diet.  The best bet is to buy pastured eggs.

2.  Free-Range

The USDA doesn’t have defined standards for free-range.  The hens simply have access to the outdoors but, it doesn’t mean they actually see the light of day.  This also doesn’t tell us anything about the hen’s diet.

3.  Grass-Fed

Meat and dairy can be labelled grass-fed if they were fed grass for the majority of their lives.  However, it doesn’t mean that they aren’t tie grains, soy, or other farming byproducts during their lifetime.  You are better off looking for grass-finished products which are required to be fed grass 100% of their life.  Look for grass-finished and organic on those labels.

4.  Natural

The USDA allows this label to be placed on any minimal processed product without artificial sweeteners or additives.  It does not refer to how the animal was raised and it could still be fed additives and or antibiotics.  So don’t be fooled by the term “Natural”

5.  No added hormones

The USDA prohibits added hormones in poultry and pork so this label may give you false confidence in the quality of the product.  Beef hormone use is up to the farmer–so an organic label is a little more promising.

For more information on label reading and buzzwords visit http://whole9life.com

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Thanks again to Kevin Deeth for another great post!  The timing of this information is perfect considering the heightened awareness of processed foods and their toxicity to our bodies.  All of our low-fat diet foods are simply free radicals gone wild!  Old cousin Joe (see Free Radical post) is throwing an all nighter in our guts when we eat these foods!  Remember that the Adkins diet may have seemed great at the time, however Dr. Adkins is now unfortunately deceased.  Vitality is the key–focus on lifestyle changes, not dieting!

Kevin writes:

I read a great article on the Wall Street Journal that inspired this post.

Over the last 20 years marketers and food manufactures have coaxed consumers into believing that the cause of rising obesity rates is due to our surplus fat intake. Consumers make choices they believe are healthy based on “healthy labels” when in fact they are not.We’re bombarded with supposedly guilt-free options: baked potato chips, fat-free ice cream, low-fat candies, which people think are healthy options because they are marketed as “low-fat” or “natural”. Yes, a high amount of saturated fat and trans fat is not good, but healthy fats such as the monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats, and omega-3s have the opposite effect and are essential to a healthy/well-balanced diet.

Myth: All fats are equal—and equally bad for you.

Fact: Saturated fats and trans fats are bad for you because they raise your cholesterol and increase your risk for heart disease. But monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are good for you, lowering cholesterol and reducing your risk of heart disease.

Myth: Fat-free means healthy.

Fact: A “fat-free” label doesn’t mean you can eat all you want without consequences to your waistline. Many fat-free foods are high in sugar, refined carbohydrates, and calories.

Myth: Eating a low-fat diet is the key to weight loss.

Fact: The obesity rates for Americans have doubled in the last 20 years, coinciding with the low-fat revolution. Cutting calories is the key to weight loss, and since fats are filling, they can help curb overeating.

In recent years people have started to figure out that fat may not be main contributor to rising obesity rates, but a surplus of processed carbohydrates may actually be at the forefront of our problems. Cue, the “low-carb” diets where consumers restrict carb intake to under 100g/day. A recent article published by the Wall Street Journal claims that “A diet based on healthy carbohydrates—rather than a low-fat or low-carbohydrate diet—offers the best chance of keeping weight off without bringing unwanted side effects”… and I couldn’t agree more.

The Study

Goal:  The study was designed to look at the impact of the three diets on measures of energy expenditure, in addition to assessing hormones, fat levels in the blood and other health markers.

  • Participants followed a low glycemic food plan that focused on  fish, fruit, vegetables, nuts and whole grains. The Study explains while people who follow a low-carb diet also lose weight effectively, they have trouble keeping it off and encounter unwanted side effects.
  • Participants were placed on one of three diets for a month: a low-fat diet limiting fats to 20% of total calories; a low-carbohydrate diet modeled on the Atkins diet, limiting carbohydrate intake to 10% of total calories; and a low-glycemic-index diet, which contained 40% of total calories from carbohydrates, 40% from fats and 20% from protein. Participants were then switched to the other two diets during two additional four-week periods.

Results

  • “The low-fat diet had the worst effect” on energy expenditure, Dr. Ludwig said. Participants on that diet also had increases in triglycerides, a type of fat, and lower levels of so-called good cholesterol. “We should avoid severely restricting any major nutrient and focus on the quality of the nutrient,”
  • The low-carb diet had the biggest boost in total energy expenditure, burning about 300 calories more per day than those on the low-fat diet—about the same as an hour of moderate exercise. But that bump came at a cost: increases in cortisol, a stress hormone, and a measure of inflammation called CRP, which can raise the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes.
  • Those on the low-glycemic-index diet burned about 150 calories a day more than those on the low-fat diet without any negative impacts on cholesterol levels or various hormones, making it the ideal diet, Dr. Ludwig said. The glycemic index measures the impact of carbohydrates on blood-sugar levels.

Conclusion and Takeaway

A balanced diet filled with healthy fats and healthy carbohydrates is ideal for loosing weight and keeping it off. Yes a low-carb diet can be effective, but you may develop other health risks, suffer from low energy levels, and risk  putting weight back on. Carbohydrates are used by our body as energy that can help sustain an efficient and worth-while workout. If your workout is jeopardized due to an nonavailability of adequate energy levels from carbohydrates then your exercise goals are compromised. Just to clarify; I am not advocating people go load up on pasta, breads, cereals, and other processed carbs. The key is to make sure the carbohydrates you do consume all come with a healthy dose of fiber and protein with a low glycemic index from things like fruit, vegetables, minimally processed oats and whole grains.

My Favorite Carb Sources

Quinoa

Steel Cut Oats

Black Beans

Source:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304458604577490943279845790.html?mod=e2tw

Thanks for reading and let me know if you have any comments or questions.

From South Bend,

Kevin
Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Exercise, Guest Blog, Humor, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Food Additives: Read the Label Part 2/10

Considering that a typical household in the USA spends 90% of their food budget on processed foods, we are exposed to a multitude of food additives that have negative health side effects.  Since Susan was cured by eliminating red dye # 40 from her diet–consider what ailments you could cure yourself of by eliminating your unknown nemesis?  The long term consequensces and cumulative effects could be your silent killer!

 

The top five food additives to avoid:

Artificial Sweeteners

Aspartame is a high intensity sweeter that has hit the market at an alarming rate in food items entitled “diet” or “sugar-free”.  It is classified as a carcinogen and is highly neurotoxic!  Headaches, dizziness, confusion, migraines and seizures can all be caused from it.  Allergy and Asthma suffers should avoid it as well.  Check out the documentary Sweet World: A Poisoned World to learn more.

MSG

MSG is an amino acid used as a flavor enhancer in many soups, salad dressings, chips, and frozen entrees.  Yes, it’s in a lot more than just Chinese food.  The real trick is that the FDA allows 20 other pseudonames for MSG to be used in package labeling!  MSG has the ability to affect neurological pathways in the brain and neutralize leptin’s (hormone that controls appetite) ability to tell our bodies to stop eating.  That’s why it’s virtually impossible to eat just one or two Cheetos!

High Fructose Corn Syrup

High Fructose Corn Syrup is a highly refined sugar that is derived from the processing orf corn.  It is mainly used in prepackaged food.  Since these types of foods are the primary source of calories for most Americans, it is one of the greatest offenders!!!  HCFS contributes to weight gain more than any other substance.

Food Coloring

Food coloring is found in meats, soda, juices, and salad dressings.  It may contribute to behavior issues and play a significant reduction in a child’s ability to learn.  This may be while I had a 2 hour drag out protest from Emma last night when I told her it was bath time!  I caught her drinking a diet coke when I got home from work.  Ironically, most of the dyes used in our foods have been banned in most other countries including Norway, France, and Sweeden.

Trans fat

Trans fat is one of the most dangerous substances to consume.  It is used to enhance the shelf life of food products.  It is found in margarine (yep–still one molecule from plastic), chips, baked goods, and fast foods.  Trans fat increases LDL levels and lowers HDL (good cholesterol) increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke, inflammation, and diabetes.

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Exercise, Weight Loss Comments Off on Food Additives: Read the Label Part 2/10

Deception in the Food Industry

Watch this little tidbit!  Very informative!

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Even an 11 year old gets it!

Even an 11 year old gets it!  It is amazing how we forget the basics as we age.  We allow life experiences to cloud our judgement into thinking that this journey is about money, technology, and believing what we are told.  The perspective of child can really help open the mind to educate ourselves and seek out new truths!   This journey is about prioritizing yourself, the people you love, and opening your mind daily to new ideas and concepts.  Jeez, I hope Sidney marries this kid someday!

Posted on by Angela in Body, Call to action, Diet, disease, Family, Humor, Spirit, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

The Reality of the Intrusion of Red Dye #40

Ok–hold on because it’s going to be a bumpy ride!

The following foods contain the infamous Red Dye #40:

Cereals—Kix, Lucky Charms, Reece’s, Trix, Fruit Loops, Fruity Pebbles, and Captain Crunchberries

Yogurts–Dannon, Yoplait, Breyer’s, Colombo, and Trix

Juices and drinks– V8, Hi-C, Minute Maid, Gatorade, Sunkist, Hawaiian Punch, Koolaid, Crystal Light, Pepsi, Ocean Spray , and Lipton iced tea

Sauces and dressings— bullion cubes, BBQ sauce, Catalina dressing

Snacks—Nutragrain bars, Poptarts, Jello pudding, Little Debbie products, granola bars

Cakes and doughs—Pillsbury/Duncan Hines cresent rolls, frosting, pie crusts, cake mix, quick breads

Candy— Brach’s, fruit snacks,Jolly ranchers, Twizzlers, M&M’s, Starburst, Skittles, Lifesavers, Altoids, Smarties, Trident, Tootsie Rolls

ETC ETC ETC—This list is incomplete!  Please visit  http://www.red40.com/  for the complete details. 

Remember:  This small dye changed Susan’s life for the worst ( see post When I let go..)  and eliminating it changed her life back for the better.  Do you believe in miracles?–I do now!

Posted on by Angela in Diet, disease, Green Living, Nutrition, Organic, vegan, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

The Red Flags of Food Additives

Okay, I’ll admit that only recently I have started reading food labels.  To be honest, I just don’t have the time to read labels while shopping because I’m rushing.  Frankly, the people cluttering the aisles reading ingredients just annoy me.  It’s not worse than the texting driver holding up traffic to complete the text.  I have learned that labels can be deceiving.  Here are a few of the stealth Gluten Red Flags to watch!

Gluten Free does not always mean gluten free.  Definitely avoid wheat, wheat gluten, barley, and rye.  However, malt or hydrolyzed vegetable protein are also enemies!  Be especially careful of cereals, pastas, cakes and cookies.  You can substitute with rice or potato flour.  Substitute rice noodles for traditional pasta. 

“Food Allergy and Food Intolerance” by Dr Jon Brostoff is an excellent resource in understanding food intolerance symptoms and has a large index of buzz words to watch for when reading labels.

Dee had a similar experience yesterday:

Sorry to pick on a brand name, but this is such a perfect example of why we need to read labels. I bought some things for a health fair at my work, and smoothies in a bottle were specifically requested. So I loaded my shopping cart with apples, bananas and Frusion. The first thing that caught my eye was 4% juice. As I was unpacking groceries, I decided to try one. Quickly glanced at the label without my reading glasses and saw 180 calories. My non-dairy coconut and almond milks are about 100 so when you add fruit I thought that sounded normal. Just now, I put on the glasses to see that — sure enough — high fructose corn syrup is item number four on the label, after yogurt, water and sugar. There are 33 grams of sugar. For comparison, Kool-Aid (pure liquid poison) has only 25. Fresh fruit is loaded with fiber but the drink has none. Here is a better smoothie option: 8 oz. rice milk (120 calories + 11 grams sugar) and 1 cup strawberries (65 calories and 12 grams sugar) plus 4 oz. Greek yogurt (65 calories + 4 grams sugar). Even though the calories are higher, the sugar is much lower and it doesn’t contain high fructose corn syrup. It also has some great protein from the milk and yogurt and complex carbs from the fresh fruit. One real smoothie starts the day off right, no hunger until lunch. Even though processes and packaged foods are convenient, you always are better off with whole foods in their natural form. Remember that one very helpful website to use for learning about the nutritional benefits of most foods is www.calorie-count.com.

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I’m a plastic girl living in a plastic world!

“Margarine was originally manufactured to fatten turkeys. When it killed the turkeys, the people who had put all the money into the research wanted a payback so they put their heads together to figure out what to do with this product to get their money back. It was a white substance with no food appeal so they added the yellow coloring and sold it to people to use in place of butter. How do you like it? They have come out with some clever new flavorings….

DO YOU KNOW.. The difference between margarine and butter? Read on to the end…gets very interesting!

  • Both have the same amount of calories.
  • Butter is slightly higher in saturated fats at 8 grams; compared to5 grams for margarine.
  • Eating margarine can increase heart disease in women by 53% over eating the same amount of butter, according to a recent Harvard Medical Study.
  • Eating butter increases the absorption of many other nutrients in other foods.
  • Butter has many nutritional benefits where margarine has a few and only because they are added!
  • Butter tastes much better than margarine and it can enhance the flavors of other foods.
  • Butter has been around for centuries where margarine has been around for less than 100 years.

And here’s the most disturbing fact…Margarine is but ONE MOLECULE away from being PLASTIC… and shares 27 ingredients with PAINT.

These facts alone were enough to have me avoiding margarine for life and anything else that is hydrogenated (this means hydrogen is added, changing the molecular structure of the substance).

Open a tub of margarine and leave it open in your garage or shaded area. Within a couple of days you will notice a couple of things:

* no flies, not even those pesky fruit flies will go near it (that should tell you something)

* it does not rot or smell differently because it has no value ; nothing will grow on it. Even those teeny weeny micro-organisms will not a find a home to grow. Why? Because it is nearly plastic. Would you melt your Tupperware and spread that on your toast?”

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