Sherry's Story

Sherry has a great story.  She has been diabetic for years and she has made some massive changes!   "I have been on a lifestyle change. It has been a year following a ketogenic food plan.  When I started this journey Read more

Pharmacy to Farmacy

Many of you may know Erin-- the fabulous Pharm D that worked in our office a few years back.  Erin is a phenomenal gal and we embarked on the journey  into natural medicine around the same time.  As we both Read more

When Should I Take My Supplements?

If you are like me -- you are just starting to realize why it is important to add supplements to your diet.  Even if we are eating a clean, healthy and unprocessed diet;  the mineral content of the soil Read more

Natural Tips for Avoiding Colds

This cold and flu season is still upon us and unfortunately, many patients are still being plagued by these nasty viral symptoms.  Here are a few tips to try if you feel like you are coming down with something. Of Read more

More Homemade Salad Dressings

Blackberry Balsamic Vinaigrette 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp local honey 1/3 cup blackberries   Process all the ingredients together in a blender and then season with ground pepper and sea salt The beauty of this recipe Read more

Healthy Mayo and Ranch Dressing

This stuff is a must -- If you read labels these days you will be hard pressed to find a mayonnaise or salad dressing that doesn't contain some type of vegetable oil.  Even the commercial mayos that advertise to Read more

Cauliflower Crust Pizza

So I got a little wicked crazy this weekend and decided to splurge on some pizza.  We do gluten-free carry out around here sometimes, but my future son-in-law inspired me to make my own cauliflower pizza crust. He made Read more

Pumpkin Chai Smoothie

Here's a throwback post that is certainly appropriate for this October weekend.  This smoothie matches the season and will be a great way to start the lovely fall day. Thanks to Smoothie Queen Amy for this great recipe I can't wait Read more

Body

Now this makes me happy!

I recently got an email from one of my fabulous compliant patients.  She had an ALCAT test done to check for food sensitivities about 4 months ago and this is the testimonial/update that she has graciously allowed me to share with you.  I love when patients take responsibility for their health and really get better!!!

 

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” I have continued faithfully on my new way of eating and still feel great! I have less pain, fewer to no headaches, little to no inflammation, more energy, more mental clarity, and while I don’t believe I’ve lost any additional weight, I certainly haven’t gained any…and that is without regular exercise. 🙂

Here’s how I believe I’ve been able to be successful at staying on the plan:

– The ALCAT test proved most helpful, because I think it could take a lifetime of trial and error to figure out foods that may be hurting. The list of low, moderate, and high intolerant and list of acceptable foods are wonderful guidelines for eating in a way that helps rather than hurts. When people ask me about this, they invariably want to know what I’m no longer eating, but I must reiterate to them, that the test is the ONLY way to know for sure if a food/additive is bothering them. This highly customized view of things keeps me away from FAD/TREND diets or food systems that are based on points, counting calories, portions, etc. I think this is difficult for people to grasp, but eating foods off MY acceptable list and either abstaining or keeping to a minimum the intolerant foods helps me feel better; feel satiated, and therefore, I don’t worry about calorie counting or portions.

– When I started eating differently, I kept a journal. I think I wrote down about everything I put in my mouth for 120 days. This helped keep me on target especially with trying to eat five times during the day. I still struggle with that, but because I’ve changed the WAY I eat, I no longer worry about over-eating or consuming empty non-nutritional foods when I do feel really hungry.

– My family, friends, and co-workers have been super supportive. I’m surprised by how some of my family members will actually ask what I can eat so they are sure to have something for me when inviting me over for a meal. They’re all used to me making menu substitutions now, too, and I don’t get crazy with it. For example, yesterday I went to Applebees after church. I ordered grilled chicken with onions and mushrooms, but it also came with veggies (carrots, broccoli and squash) over red potatoes (which are a no no for me). I asked to leave off the potatoes, so they gave me extra veggies instead. YUM! I do the same thing with salads.

– And finally, realizing that I wake up more easily, have less pain, and don’t miss those cyclical headaches keeps me on track. I do NOT want to go back to feeling so terrible all the time. I’ve had a couple of headaches since being on the plan, but they have been much less severe and do not last long. I used to get headaches that lasted for days and were just brutal. I still have some pain in my hands each morning, but it’s possible that’s from years of typing/using computers. I don’t have near the pain throughout my body as I used to, and I don’t have the “heavy” feeling anymore. That one’s difficult to explain, but sometimes I just felt heavy, and I was getting depressed about it. I feel much lighter these days, literally and figuratively. :)”

food allergy

Thanks girl!!!  Love it and keep up the good work!  Thanks for sharing as you are an inspiration to other patients.  Please contact me or Michelle 317-217-2626 if you are interested in ordering an ALCAT test for yourself —there is more information on the ALCAT page of the blog.425352_10150688992766282_2072045193_n

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Guest Blog, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Do I have to buy organic? The Dirty Dozen

Sure, we would all love to buy everything we eat organic and process free, but who can afford that in today’s economic times.  I struggle with the issue of spending so much on food especially if it isn’t all eaten before it goes bad.   If you are buying veggies on a budget, try to go organic for the Dirty Dozen foods.  These top 12 are known to be grown with the most pesticides.  The rest you can probably get by not buying organic.  Regardless, any fruit or vegetable (organic or not) is still better than that McDonald’s cheeseburger so don’t spend too much time worrying!

Peach

Apple

Bell Pepper

Celery

Nectarine

Strawberries

Cherries

Kale

Lettuce

Grapes

Carrot

Pear

Posted on by Angela in Diet, disease, Green Living, Nutrition, Organic, vegan, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Calcium Supplements—are they for the cows?

The easiest way to get your calcium!
EAT IT!

 

I am reposting this oldie but goodie with all of the questions I have gotten this last week on calcium supplements and some of the new information that has been released regarding their use.  I really feel like we should be getting our calcium from food.  Primarily=plant based food considering some of the dangers of milk and soy in today’s food supply.  Here are some of the best plant based sources of calcium.

 

Enjoy the best way to get your calcium–through your food.  Yes friends, Citracal with D is a good supplement but there really isn’t any reason why we need to take an additional manufactured supplement when there are so many great foods that contain plenty of calcium.  Edamame, oranges, beans, and kale all have great amounts of calcium and you get the benefit of all the other nutrients and antioxidants!  Remember those free radical cancer fighters?  Eat your veggies people!  Eat your veggies!

The following is from http://www.healthaliciousness.com

#1: Collard Greens (Cooked)

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup Chopped
210mg 357mg
21% DV 36% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Collard Greens

 

#2: Kale (Raw)

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup
205mg 137mg
21% DV 14% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Kale

 

#3: Turnip Greens

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup Chopped
190mg 105mg
19% DV 10% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts

 

#4: Garlic

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup Calcium in 1 Clove
181mg 246mg 5mg
18% DV 25% DV 1% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Garlic

 

#5: Arugula (Rocket)

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup
160mg 32mg
16% DV 4% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts

 

#6: Broccoli Rabe (Rapini)

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Bunch Cooked (437 grams)
118mg 516mg
12% DV 52% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Broccoli Rabe (Rapini)

 

#7: Mustard Greens

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup Chopped
101mg 152mg
10% DV 15% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Mustard Greens

 

#8: Sun Dried Tomatoes

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup
110mg 59mg
11% DV 6% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts

 

#9: Spinach (Raw)

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup
99mg 30mg
10% DV 3% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Spinach

 

#10: Okra

Calcium per 100g serving Calcium in 1 Cup Sliced
96mg 177mg
10% DV 18% DV

Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Okra
Read more at http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-calcium-vegetables.php#HctdUrebgCISwMHs.99

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Nutrition, vegan, Whole Food Leave a comment

The Five to One Rule–A Love/Hate Relationship

874bbe55e42a6801631b1008f4515f33Psychologists can read verbal and physical clues between a couple in the first few minutes of interacting with them.  I recently learned of a theory that could predict whether a couple will stay together that is incredibly accurate and relatively simple.  It’s called the 5:1 rule.  For every one negative comment or physical gesture, the couples that had five positive ones to every one negative were most likely to make it in their relationships.  For example, a positive touch, glance or affirmation for the other person strongly outweighs a negative/judgemental comment.  I have looked around at my relationships with all the people in my life–the most positive relationships are reassuring and create  positive energy.  I am challenging myself this week to try to outweigh any negative thought even toward myself with 5 positives.  I challenge you to look at the most positive relationships in your life that you have and see if this concept applies?

Posted on by Angela in Call to action, disease, Mind, Nutrition, Spirit Leave a comment

Some People Do Get Better!

Leslee and I were at wit’s end!  She has been miserable with chronic diarrhea that has completely debilitated her life.  After multiple tests and trials of treatments–she said “just put me on an antidepressant and I’ll eat myself  into an oblivion of fatness.”  Luckily, we had a brainstorm idea after reading some my recent blog posts and articles.  We decided that she had nothing to lose by going wheat/gluten-free for a week just to see how she felt.  That weekend she and her friend made homemade bread as her last hoorah!  That evening she spent quality toilet time piling through gluten-free recipes.  She went gung-ho the next week—fruit smoothies for breakfast, a green juice for lunch, and a gluten/wheat-free dinner.  After 3 days exactly she was shocked at having 1 normal bowel movement a day.  After 1 week,  the “chicken skin” bumps on her arms had disappeared.  It seemed too good to be true.  She found a gluten-free pizza from Dominos and actually ate it without symptoms.  After around 2 weeks of improving symptoms, she decided to test her theory by trying some bread—Bah Bahm–dropping bombs within 30 minutes!  I saw her today and her weight was down, acne was cleared, bloating was gone and blood pressure (for which she takes meds) was remarkably low.  Even her cardiologist was surprised by the results.  She is staying with the diet because she feels so remarkable.  She will be sharing some of her stories with us in the near future so stay tuned.  She is a remarkably intelligent, charming, witty working mother.  You will absolutely fall in love with her!!!!  Thanks Leslee for letting me share your story.  You are inspiring others!

*** Tip of the day:  IHOP puts pancake batter in their scrambled eggs to make them look fluffy!

 

 

Leslee’s Super Green Smoothie Recipe

spinach

kale

celery

apples

ginger

lemon to taste

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Against the Grain—part 2

So in the last 3 weeks I have been putting on weight and belly fat like crazy.  I didn’t figure it out till this morning when I was putting together this post on wheat—-Bingo (light bulb)– A few weeks ago I got the crazy notion to add some goldfish crackers on my salad at lunch.  My obsessive compulsive habits had me eating those little heathens daily.  Despite eating primarily PALEO, that little bit of wheat has started that vicious wheat belly cycle all over again.  Needless to say, I will be eliminating those today.

So here is the part 2 of the dreaded wheat conundrum–wheat is a drug!  Crack if you must.

Wheat actually acts like an opioid in the brain.  Like all opioids, wheat can stimulate appetite.  In 1981, the glycemic index was first introduced and ironically wheat had a higher index than sugar and white bread.  Wheat elevates sugar levels which in turn elevate insulin levels.  Insulin resistance can then ensue which can lead to diabetes.  Wheat has a component called amylopectin A which can really elevate insulin levels.  Not to mention that it contains the protein Gliadin which can cross the blood brain barrier.  It actually unlocks the intestinal barrier which can allow foreign antigens to enter the blood stream.  This leads to Leaky Gut Syndrome.  But, more on that to come……

 

 

Symptoms of Insulin Resistance

general fatigue, after meals

difficulty losing weight

always hungry

need for sweets after meals

cravings for sweets are not satisfied after eating them

frequent urination

waist circumference is equal to or greater than hips

irritability between meals

excessive thirst

More detailed information can be found in Dr. William Davis’s book–“Wheat Belly”

and by visiting http://www.wheatbellyblog.com

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Why am I always hungry?

Here is a great new post from our dear friend Dee–please check out her site http://www.gettingthebestoffood.com   She shares her journey and includes a realistic attitude that accounts for all the daily struggles, stress, and obstacles that sabotage us relententlessly.  You go Dee!!!
The first time I saw this diagram was nearly a year ago and it has never left my memory. Over the past few months I have noticed how refined foods such as white bread and sugar have effected hunger throughout the day. This simple illustration shows how all highly processed foods, fats and oils look in the stomach. I’ll be right back, gotta grab an apple.OK, I’m back, less starving than I was a minute ago. If you look at all of the diets that have been successful and popular, most of them have fruits and veggies in common. Atkins, not so much because it’s an all-protein diet. The challenge that I’ve found is getting veggies to taste good. Fruits are naturally delicious without anything added, but veggies are usually better when you make them bad…like broccoli with cheese sauce, fried green beans with butter, creamed peas, spinach au gratin. At this point, I’m finding it more challenging to make veggies fun. Well, fun is a strong word. I don’t know if they’ve ever been fun. Here are some tricks I’ve learned:

  1. Bake kale with a spritz of olive oil for crispy chips with a touch of sea salt
  2. Hide spinach in smoothies, soups, baked eggs
  3. Mash sweet potatoes with a touch of cinnamon, almond milk and agave nectar and bake for fake pumpkin pie
  4. Use romaine or Boston lettuce leaves to wrap the healthy ingredients you would normally put on bread, like tuna salad, grilled chicken, lean steak
  5. Soak dates — use the water as a healthy natural sweetening liquid and puree the soaked dates with water to make a paste as a solid sweeter for recipes (paste with spaghetti squash and cinnamon is great.
Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Green Living, Guest Blog, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Healthy Nuts!

Thanks to Wellness Warrior Annie for sharing this with us!

BulkCashews.jpg

A great source of nutrition, a cashew is no less a superfood than other nuts. It is extremely rich in copper,manganese, magnesium, and tryptophan, and is a good source of many other essential nutrients like protein, iron, selenium, antioxidants, and phytochemicals. One serving of organic cashews is equivalent to ¼ cup or 34.26 grams and provides:

  • 37.5% of your daily copper requirement
  • 28.4% of your daily manganese requirement
  • 28.1% of your daily tryptophan requirement
  • 25% of your daily magnesium requirement

Everyone should add cashews to their diet, as they are extremely beneficial for health. Let us look at the some of the most important health benefits of these kidney-shaped nuts:

1. Cashews help you lower your risk of heart disease

Cashews, like other nuts, are a good source of antioxidants, which various studies have shown are capable of reducing the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease. Given below is a brief description of two scientific studies that confirm their ability to improve cardiovascular health:

– Study 1

Researchers combined the evidence from four epidemiological studies – the Iowa Women’s study, Physician’s HealthStudy, Adventist Health Study, and Nurses’ Health Study – and found that:

  • Participants who ate at least four servings of nuts per week had a 37% lower chance of suffering from heart disease than subjects who did not eat nuts
  • Every additional serving of nuts over four servings per week further reduces the risk of heart disease by approximately 8%

– Study 2

Researchers who conducted the Iowa Women’s Health Study reveal that:

  • Subjects who ate one serving of nuts, such as cashews, recorded 11% fewer incidences of death from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease
  • Subjects who ate 1-4 servings of nuts recorded 19% fewer incidences of death from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease

2. Cashews promote good cardiovascular health

Cashews are rich in oleic acid, a monosaturated omega-9 fatty acid which constitutes 75% of the  total monounsaturated fats present in cashews. Monosaturated fats, in turn, accounts for 75% of the total fat content in cashews.

Studies show that monosaturated fats, such as oleic acid, promote good heart health by reducing the levels of triglycerides in the blood. High triglyceride levels are known to considerably increase the risk of heart disease.

In addition to oleic acid, cashews are extremely rich in magnesium, an essential nutrient that helps  hypertensive patients manage blood pressure. Hypertensive patients are at an increased risk of heart disease than people with normal blood pressure, and it is absolutely vital that they keep their blood pressure in check.

We provide the results of a recent study to help you better understand the anti-hypertensive capability of cashews.

– A new study shows magnesium lowers blood pressure in hypertensive patients

In a study conducted for 12 weeks, researchers gave magnesium supplements daily to the participants in one group and a placebo to other participants. At the end of the 12 weeks, researchers found that hypertensives who had received a supplement of magnesium oxide daily recorded a significant decrease in their blood pressure.

3. Cashews reduces the risk of colon cancer and health conditions caused by copper deficiency

Scientists believe that copper deficiency may be associated with increased fecal water alkaline phosphatase activity and fecal free radical production, both of which are listed as risk factors for colorectal cancer (colon cancer). Cashews have a high copper content one serving provides 37.5% of your daily copper requirement – andcan help you prevent colon cancer.

As a matter of fact, cashews are useful in the prevention of all health conditions associated with copper deficiency,such as ruptured blood vessels, osteoporosis, elevated LDL cholesterol, joint problems, anemia, and irregular heartbeat.

4. Cashews promotes healthy bones

Calcium is important for healthy bones, most of us know this. However, what many of us don’t know is that magnesium is as necessary as calcium for strong bones. Organic cashews are rich in both these minerals and are extremely beneficial for your bones.

5. Cashews prevents nerve cells from becoming over activated

Magnesium and calcium are two minerals which complement each other. Magnesium, in effect, works as a calcium channel blocker (CCB), regulating calcium’s entry into the bloodstream. In other words, a magnesium deficiency can lead to high blood calcium levels, which in turn can lead to serious health conditions such as overactive nerve cells.

Ample intake of magnesium keeps the nerve cells relaxed and obviates the risk of overactive nerve cells. Magnesium also prevents other health conditions associated with too much calcium in the bloodstream, such as heart attack and high blood pressure. In addition, regular intake of magnesium is known to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches, reduce the severity of an asthma attack, and relieve muscle tension, soreness, and fatigue.Cashews are a great source of magnesium, allowing you to easily meet your daily requirement for magnesium and enjoy the health benefits that ample intake of magnesium yields.

6. Cashews help in weight management

Contrary to popular belief, nuts lower your risk of weight gain. Although cashews, like other nuts, have high fat content, they help you in weight management, primarily because most of the fat is a good fat. They are also a good source of fiber, which, when consumed in abundance, minimizes the risk of weight gain.

A study published in the esteemed journal Obesity shows that nuts can be good for people who don’t want to gain weight. Take a look:

An independent study confirms that nuts aid weight management:

Spanish researchers conducted a study involving 8,865 participants and recorded the following observations:

  • Participants who ate two or more servings of nuts per week had a 31% less chance of putting on weight than individuals who never or seldom ate nuts
  • Among those who put on weight, participants who ate nuts at least two times a week put on less weight than participants who never or seldom ate nuts

7. Cashews prevent gallstones

According to the data collected on more than 80,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study, women who eat one ounce of nuts like cashews are 25% less likely to develop gallstones.

How many servings of cashew you must eat in a week to enjoy the health benefits it provides?

It is recommended that you consume at least 4 servings of raw organic cashews per week to enjoy the numerous health benefits that it provides.

Safety Concerns

Cashews are safe for everyone, except for those who are allergic to them or who have a certain specific conditions.Here are a few safety concerns associated with cashews:

  • Cashews interfere with other minerals such as calcium. If you are taking cashews to help you with a particular condition, speak to your doctor before eating them. This is because the intake of cashews may need to be closely monitored in such cases. Healthy people, on the other hand, do not have to worry about such things and can safely eat as many servings of cashews as they want in a week.
  • You should not have cashews if you are allergic to them. Consult your doctor immediately if you develop a food allergy after eating cashews. Common symptoms associated with food allergy include, but are not limited to, the following: skin rash, swelling of the throat, lips, or tongue, eczema, nasal congestion, wheezing, difficulty breathing, light-headedness, dizziness, diarrhea, constipation, insomnia, and fatigue.
Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Nutrition, Whole Food Leave a comment

Sabotaged by the Holidays

How to keep holiday festivities from sabotaging your health.

 

We all want to join in the fun of the holiday season. But late nights, too much food and drink, and the stress of meeting others’ expectations can do a number on your health and fitness. Is it possible to allow yourself a few indulgences without completely undermining your wellbeing?

 

_____

 

Dr. Kathryn Colteryahn, with IU Health Physicians – Internal Medicine, provides practical advice on maintaining a healthy holiday season.

Learn more

_____

 

 

Yes, and there are two keys to success: staying active and setting realistic expectations.

 

Daily exercise, even moderate activity such as walking or taking the stairs, helps burn additional calories, relieves stress, and inspires more healthful eating habits. Try substituting a few food-centric activities (like baking cookies) with more physical activities: take the family ice skating, go caroling, or volunteer at a soup kitchen.

 

Next, be realistic. If you’re following a weight loss plan, don’t expect to shed pounds in December, but try to maintain your weight instead. Don’t indulge every single day; stick to healthful foods when you can.

 

Specifically, here’s how you can control the most common holiday culprits:

 

All those parties. Eat a light meal and drink plenty of water before you go. While you’re there, enjoy a glass of wine or champagne, but alternate with club soda on the rocks with lime. The appearance of a drink in your hand will make it less likely someone else will insist on pouring you another.

Break room candy and popcorn. If these gifts are from vendors, let them know you’d rather have a healthier alternative, like a fruit basket. If that fails, avoid the break room by taking a brisk walk instead.

 

Dining out too often. Have the server box up half before your meal is brought to the table. (Don’t worry about offending, they’re used to this request.) Make more time for cooking at home by spending a little time on Sunday afternoon to prep the week’s meals. Picking up a few groceries daily on your lunch hour, as opposed to on your way home, can help you avoid the break room candy and get you home a littler earlier to enjoy your time in the kitchen.

 

Pressure from family and friends. The truth is, we usually bring this pressure on ourselves. So prioritize. Be honest by saying that you simply cannot get around to everyone, every year. Alternate between different branches of the family from year to year. It’s okay to say no, and you’ll be surprised at how understanding they are.

 

And remember, it’s okay NOT to have plans, too. Take time off for yourself. Remain active, as well as realistic.

 

_____

 

Author of this article

Kathryn Colteryahn, MD, specializes in internal medicine. She is a guest columnist and located at IU Health West Hospital, 1115 Ronald Regan Parkway, Suite 318, in Avon. She can be reached by calling the office at 317.217.2632.

 

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Exercise, Family, Guest Blog, Nutrition, Organic, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Get Real

Everyone has a story.  A life changing moment when they undergo hardship and change their perspective on life by developing a new sense of identity.  Seth Godin calls it the “flipping point”.  Alcoholics Anonymous calls it “rock bottom”.  I simply call it my story–or your story—- Something that happens to make you change the way you think about things.  Certainly it can happen several times in life —and probably should as we all continue to evolve as people and adapt to our surroundings.

My good friend Katie decided to share her story and discovery of her life mission.  Katie writes,” 10 years ago when I was on bed rest for my daughter, Molly, my entire perspective on health & life changed drastically. I already shared with you my Juicing love 🙂:) but wanted to share with you the rest of the change. Having been a public school teacher & cheerleading coach for 10 years I knew girls needed women who had “been in their shoes” to come alongside them and be transparent about life. Thus, began a ministry I started for girls, Get REAL in Christ (Get REAL inC). www.getrealinc.org We have programs for girls from grades 1 and up.

In Sept. we partnered with the Indiana Fever for an event which opened an exciting door for us. Former Victoria’s Secret Model, Kylie Bisutti, has joined our team and wants to be a voice to girls on respecting themselves & help us empower other women to come alongside girls and start Get REAL groups in their communities.”

I encourage you to check out the Get Real site!  Katie is an inspirational person that empowers herself against disease and is constantly reaching out to help others!

Posted on by Angela in Benevolence, Body, Call to action, Diet, disease, Exercise, Mind, Nutrition, Spirit, Whole Food Leave a comment