When Should I Take My Supplements?

If you are like me -- you are just starting to realize why it is important to add supplements to your diet.  Even if we are eating a clean, healthy and unprocessed diet;  the mineral content of the soil Read more

Natural Tips for Avoiding Colds

This cold and flu season is still upon us and unfortunately, many patients are still being plagued by these nasty viral symptoms.  Here are a few tips to try if you feel like you are coming down with something. Of Read more

More Homemade Salad Dressings

Blackberry Balsamic Vinaigrette 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp local honey 1/3 cup blackberries   Process all the ingredients together in a blender and then season with ground pepper and sea salt The beauty of this recipe Read more

Healthy Mayo and Ranch Dressing

This stuff is a must -- If you read labels these days you will be hard pressed to find a mayonnaise or salad dressing that doesn't contain some type of vegetable oil.  Even the commercial mayos that advertise to Read more

Cauliflower Crust Pizza

So I got a little wicked crazy this weekend and decided to splurge on some pizza.  We do gluten-free carry out around here sometimes, but my future son-in-law inspired me to make my own cauliflower pizza crust. He made Read more

Pumpkin Chai Smoothie

Here's a throwback post that is certainly appropriate for this October weekend.  This smoothie matches the season and will be a great way to start the lovely fall day. Thanks to Smoothie Queen Amy for this great recipe I can't wait Read more

Gluten Free Zucchini Bread

Gluten-Free Zucchini Bread So I have been struggling with gluten-free baking because honestly -- I've never been good at baking!!  Then when I try to modify recipes using flours I'm not familiar with, it just makes  a perfect storm of Read more

Magnesium-the unloved mineral

Do you remember watching Wild Kingdom as a kid?  Did you happen to notice that the animals attacking their prey would immediately eat the organ meats.  I never really thought about why until I listened to Morley Robbins explain the Read more

disease prevention

Vitamin K 101

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Recently, I have been recommending a Vitamin K2 supplement to those of you with risk of osteopenia (bone thinning) or osteoporosis (bone loss).  I thought I would share a few of the basics on why I think this supplement is essential.

Vit K basics:

In nature, Vitamin K comes in two forms.  Vitamin K1 is found in free leafy vegetables

Vitamin K2 is found in organ meats, egg yolks and dairy products.

Vitamin K is essential in manufacturing blood clotting proteins.  In addition, it plays a vital role in keeping calcium in the bones instead of in the arteries.

The majority of research has been done on Vitamin K1 and its role in clotting ( all you coumadin/warfarin users are well aware of this).  Clinical trials show that Vitamin K2 is an important inducer of osteoblasts ( the bone building cells)  Recent studies show that Vitamin K2 may be as effective as prescription drugs in reducing the incidence of bone fracture in post menopausal women.

The nitty-gritty:

1.  Calcium is essential for good health.  However, Vitamin K2 is an important regulator of calcium and can prevent aberrant calcium metabolism in the body leading to cardiovascular disease.

2.  Insufficient Vitamin K2 leads to decreased bone mineral density which causes osteoporosis and cane actually increase the risk of heart disease.

3.  Studies in Japan show that Vitamin K2 in can substantially improve osteoporosis when given in prescription form or in the dish NATTO which is rich in K2

4.  Even small amounts of K2 helps fight heart disease by keeping calcium out of the arteries and preventing plaque.

 

Optimal amounts of Vitamin K2 are still under investigation but it seems that roughly  180-200 micrograms may be helpful.  It is estimated that 80% of Americans do not get enough K2 in their diet which is similar to the deficiency of Vitamin D we are now seeing here in America

 

Foods Containing Vitamin K2

Fermented foods such as natto or veggies fermented with a starter culture of K2  –Note miso and tempeh are not high in K2

Grass-fed organic animal products

Goose liver pate

Certain cheeses such as Brie and Gouda (75mcg/ounce)

3d rendered illustration of the human heart

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition, Whole Food 2 Comments

This is a game changer!

I lied yesterday —-the actual sessions don’t begin until sunday so you still have time!!!!  I’m registered and I listened to the preview podcast today on the Underground Wellness site and I’m pretty stoked now.  I realize it’s a little nerdy to get so excited about gas, poop, reflux and farts but remember–this is a huge issue we all suffer from!!!  Any info we can get to help ourselves is amazing.  This series is cutting edge and the average health practitioner will take about 17 years for this new info to become common knowledge.  That’s why we are getting it first!!  We deserve this free knowledge.

You can either Register for Free now for the event starting sunday –you will have 48 hours to listen to all four interviews or

 

Register HERE

 

 

or you can purchase the whole series at a discounted price and listen to the entire series as many times as you would like

 

Purchase the Series HERE

 

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition Leave a comment

Healthy Nuts!

Thanks to Wellness Warrior Annie for sharing this with us!

BulkCashews.jpg

A great source of nutrition, a cashew is no less a superfood than other nuts. It is extremely rich in copper,manganese, magnesium, and tryptophan, and is a good source of many other essential nutrients like protein, iron, selenium, antioxidants, and phytochemicals. One serving of organic cashews is equivalent to ¼ cup or 34.26 grams and provides:

  • 37.5% of your daily copper requirement
  • 28.4% of your daily manganese requirement
  • 28.1% of your daily tryptophan requirement
  • 25% of your daily magnesium requirement

Everyone should add cashews to their diet, as they are extremely beneficial for health. Let us look at the some of the most important health benefits of these kidney-shaped nuts:

1. Cashews help you lower your risk of heart disease

Cashews, like other nuts, are a good source of antioxidants, which various studies have shown are capable of reducing the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease. Given below is a brief description of two scientific studies that confirm their ability to improve cardiovascular health:

– Study 1

Researchers combined the evidence from four epidemiological studies – the Iowa Women’s study, Physician’s HealthStudy, Adventist Health Study, and Nurses’ Health Study – and found that:

  • Participants who ate at least four servings of nuts per week had a 37% lower chance of suffering from heart disease than subjects who did not eat nuts
  • Every additional serving of nuts over four servings per week further reduces the risk of heart disease by approximately 8%

– Study 2

Researchers who conducted the Iowa Women’s Health Study reveal that:

  • Subjects who ate one serving of nuts, such as cashews, recorded 11% fewer incidences of death from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease
  • Subjects who ate 1-4 servings of nuts recorded 19% fewer incidences of death from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease

2. Cashews promote good cardiovascular health

Cashews are rich in oleic acid, a monosaturated omega-9 fatty acid which constitutes 75% of the  total monounsaturated fats present in cashews. Monosaturated fats, in turn, accounts for 75% of the total fat content in cashews.

Studies show that monosaturated fats, such as oleic acid, promote good heart health by reducing the levels of triglycerides in the blood. High triglyceride levels are known to considerably increase the risk of heart disease.

In addition to oleic acid, cashews are extremely rich in magnesium, an essential nutrient that helps  hypertensive patients manage blood pressure. Hypertensive patients are at an increased risk of heart disease than people with normal blood pressure, and it is absolutely vital that they keep their blood pressure in check.

We provide the results of a recent study to help you better understand the anti-hypertensive capability of cashews.

– A new study shows magnesium lowers blood pressure in hypertensive patients

In a study conducted for 12 weeks, researchers gave magnesium supplements daily to the participants in one group and a placebo to other participants. At the end of the 12 weeks, researchers found that hypertensives who had received a supplement of magnesium oxide daily recorded a significant decrease in their blood pressure.

3. Cashews reduces the risk of colon cancer and health conditions caused by copper deficiency

Scientists believe that copper deficiency may be associated with increased fecal water alkaline phosphatase activity and fecal free radical production, both of which are listed as risk factors for colorectal cancer (colon cancer). Cashews have a high copper content one serving provides 37.5% of your daily copper requirement – andcan help you prevent colon cancer.

As a matter of fact, cashews are useful in the prevention of all health conditions associated with copper deficiency,such as ruptured blood vessels, osteoporosis, elevated LDL cholesterol, joint problems, anemia, and irregular heartbeat.

4. Cashews promotes healthy bones

Calcium is important for healthy bones, most of us know this. However, what many of us don’t know is that magnesium is as necessary as calcium for strong bones. Organic cashews are rich in both these minerals and are extremely beneficial for your bones.

5. Cashews prevents nerve cells from becoming over activated

Magnesium and calcium are two minerals which complement each other. Magnesium, in effect, works as a calcium channel blocker (CCB), regulating calcium’s entry into the bloodstream. In other words, a magnesium deficiency can lead to high blood calcium levels, which in turn can lead to serious health conditions such as overactive nerve cells.

Ample intake of magnesium keeps the nerve cells relaxed and obviates the risk of overactive nerve cells. Magnesium also prevents other health conditions associated with too much calcium in the bloodstream, such as heart attack and high blood pressure. In addition, regular intake of magnesium is known to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches, reduce the severity of an asthma attack, and relieve muscle tension, soreness, and fatigue.Cashews are a great source of magnesium, allowing you to easily meet your daily requirement for magnesium and enjoy the health benefits that ample intake of magnesium yields.

6. Cashews help in weight management

Contrary to popular belief, nuts lower your risk of weight gain. Although cashews, like other nuts, have high fat content, they help you in weight management, primarily because most of the fat is a good fat. They are also a good source of fiber, which, when consumed in abundance, minimizes the risk of weight gain.

A study published in the esteemed journal Obesity shows that nuts can be good for people who don’t want to gain weight. Take a look:

An independent study confirms that nuts aid weight management:

Spanish researchers conducted a study involving 8,865 participants and recorded the following observations:

  • Participants who ate two or more servings of nuts per week had a 31% less chance of putting on weight than individuals who never or seldom ate nuts
  • Among those who put on weight, participants who ate nuts at least two times a week put on less weight than participants who never or seldom ate nuts

7. Cashews prevent gallstones

According to the data collected on more than 80,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study, women who eat one ounce of nuts like cashews are 25% less likely to develop gallstones.

How many servings of cashew you must eat in a week to enjoy the health benefits it provides?

It is recommended that you consume at least 4 servings of raw organic cashews per week to enjoy the numerous health benefits that it provides.

Safety Concerns

Cashews are safe for everyone, except for those who are allergic to them or who have a certain specific conditions.Here are a few safety concerns associated with cashews:

  • Cashews interfere with other minerals such as calcium. If you are taking cashews to help you with a particular condition, speak to your doctor before eating them. This is because the intake of cashews may need to be closely monitored in such cases. Healthy people, on the other hand, do not have to worry about such things and can safely eat as many servings of cashews as they want in a week.
  • You should not have cashews if you are allergic to them. Consult your doctor immediately if you develop a food allergy after eating cashews. Common symptoms associated with food allergy include, but are not limited to, the following: skin rash, swelling of the throat, lips, or tongue, eczema, nasal congestion, wheezing, difficulty breathing, light-headedness, dizziness, diarrhea, constipation, insomnia, and fatigue.
Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Nutrition, Whole Food Leave a comment

Mediocrity

Another great post by Kevin Deeth—be sure to visit his site.

Social Acceptance of Mediocrity

I read this article the other day and thought it was just plain awesome. I wanted to share it with everyone to hopefully encourage people to exercise and stay active.

“I have a list of sayings that make my blood curdle, and “hey now, at least they’re up and moving” is close to the top of that list. We’ve all heard it before and probably have said it ourselves, but if you think about it, it’s depressing to see how that saying has become a norm nowadays.
           We now live in a society where doing the bare minimum required to keep your heart beating is supposed to earn you a pat on the back and a sugar-free cupcake (don’t worry, its only 100 calories…guilt free!). Since when did getting off the couch and moving around become an acceptable form of exercise? You may say, “Hey, at least they are moving around”, and yes, you’re right, that is the least they can do–but the problem is that they shouldn’t be stopping there.  Getting off your ass should be the thing you do when you wake up, not the physical highlight of your day.
90% of the time, I hear this saying when discussing those who walk as their main form of exercise. Sorry, but walking 15 minutes is NOT a workout; it’s a warmup for your warmup. Just for comparison, Alexander’s army marched over 5000 miles from Thessaloniki to the Indus river. That isn’t even counting the stops at tourist attractions or the journey home.
How long would this take you at 15 minutes a day?
Seriously, what happened to the grit that people used to have? My grandpa would call those people “the old breed”. When he lived in Africa, he would run 9 miles to school and 9 miles home everyday, with no shoes. See if you can get one of your fellow Americans to do something remotely intense for even 9 minutes before crapping out, but not before they congratulate themselves for at least “getting off the couch”.
Folks, you shouldn’t be fine with doing the least amount of work. Putting in the least amount of effort will get you the least amount of results. It shouldn’t be enough to simply walk around, you should be challenging your limits almost daily. I understand if you have a debilitating injury that limits your mobility, but most people don’t have debilitating injuries, they are just bloated and lazy.”
Directions on walking, in case you forgot.”
Conclusion
I really enjoyed reading this. I see this in the gym all the time. People get dressed in their “workout gear”, grab a sugar loaded gatorade, and sit on the bike and pedal at a slow to moderate pace for 15-20 minutes before calling it a day. 100 calories-burned later and mission accomplished. I get the same reaction when i talk to people about this. “well, at least they are in here trying”. I would much rather have people burn 100 calories playing with their kids or doing something active in the community then doing a moderate cardio routine like this. However, we live in a lazy society where convienience and luxury take priority over physical well being and activity. Do yourself a favor and surround you and your family with a group of people who live an active and healthy lifestyle so they hold you accountable when you say you are going for a 15 minute stationary bike ride and claim it to be a “workout”.

Thanks for reading and let me know if you have any questions.

From South Bend,
Kevin

kdeeth21@gmail.com

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Exercise, Guest Blog, Nutrition Leave a comment