Dealing with High Triglycerides



I’ve discovered that elevated triglycerides and fasting blood sugars have become epidemic in my practice. It’s not surprising considering all the food misinformation we have been given in the standard American diet (SAD).  I remember questioning my girl’s pediatrician about feeding them honey nut Cheerios for breakfast because they were so picky. Her answer was “have you looked at the nutrition information on the side of the Box— Cheerios are fortified with most vitamins and minerals that they need.”  WOW is all I can say–WOW.  You would think I would have known better at that point after years of medical education.  But NO –I took her word for it because that is what I was taught in med school about nutrition too.  I didn’t have any concept about the importance of vegetables and REAL FOOD on health at that point.  I’ll bet you have been in the same boat as well. We simply haven’t been taught the correct information.


Why are triglycerides important?  I thought LDL was the BAD cholesterol–

Triglycerides block insulin– that can elevate the blood sugar and lead to weight gain

High triglycerides can cause pancreatitis and be toxic to the pancreatic cells that make insulin–this can add up over time–

Here is where the LDL is affected— more triglycerides will interact with lipoproteins and cause the LDL to be smaller particles which are more likely to cause heart attacks —

So overall –the higher your triglycerides are –you are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease.

What do I want my triglyceride levels to be?

The labs say that 150mg/dl is the cutoff for high triglycerides—however the levels really need to be below 60mg/dl to help decrease the size of the LDL particles.

How do I lower my triglycerides?

  1.  Supplement with omega 3 fatty acids— I recommend 3000mg of fish oil daily.  The EPA and DHA of the fish oil help remove the (chylomicrons and VLDL) triglycerides after a meal.  I personally love the brand BLUE ICE–fermented cod liver oil.  It sounds gross but it really isn’t a large pill and doesn’t cause fish burps (you can put it in the freezer if you get the dreaded burps).
  2. Have a healthy gut flora—yup– those probiotic foods play a role here too.  You need good healthy fiber to feed those good gut microorganisms because they help reduce lipid and insulin levels.
  3. Eliminate GRAIN and SUGAR:  Yep— sorry but these elevate your sugars and cause insulin resistance — this includes alcohol/carbs —I’m sorry — I know it isn’t fun. 
  4. Intermittent fasting —this can help as well — try to go a full 12-15 hours without eating (yes- you can still drink water/coffee/tea etc–just don’t add sugar)
  5. Don’t cut back on Good Fats —these include avocado, nuts, seeds, coconut oil, and olive oil.

Posted on by Angela in disease, Nutrition Leave a comment

Add a Comment