When Should I Take My Supplements?

If you are like me -- you are just starting to realize why it is important to add supplements to your diet.  Even if we are eating a clean, healthy and unprocessed diet;  the mineral content of the soil Read more

Natural Tips for Avoiding Colds

This cold and flu season is still upon us and unfortunately, many patients are still being plagued by these nasty viral symptoms.  Here are a few tips to try if you feel like you are coming down with something. Of Read more

More Homemade Salad Dressings

Blackberry Balsamic Vinaigrette 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp local honey 1/3 cup blackberries   Process all the ingredients together in a blender and then season with ground pepper and sea salt The beauty of this recipe Read more

Healthy Mayo and Ranch Dressing

This stuff is a must -- If you read labels these days you will be hard pressed to find a mayonnaise or salad dressing that doesn't contain some type of vegetable oil.  Even the commercial mayos that advertise to Read more

Cauliflower Crust Pizza

So I got a little wicked crazy this weekend and decided to splurge on some pizza.  We do gluten-free carry out around here sometimes, but my future son-in-law inspired me to make my own cauliflower pizza crust. He made Read more

Pumpkin Chai Smoothie

Here's a throwback post that is certainly appropriate for this October weekend.  This smoothie matches the season and will be a great way to start the lovely fall day. Thanks to Smoothie Queen Amy for this great recipe I can't wait Read more

Gluten Free Zucchini Bread

Gluten-Free Zucchini Bread So I have been struggling with gluten-free baking because honestly -- I've never been good at baking!!  Then when I try to modify recipes using flours I'm not familiar with, it just makes  a perfect storm of Read more

Magnesium-the unloved mineral

Do you remember watching Wild Kingdom as a kid?  Did you happen to notice that the animals attacking their prey would immediately eat the organ meats.  I never really thought about why until I listened to Morley Robbins explain the Read more

whole foods

Why am I always hungry?

Here is a great new post from our dear friend Dee–please check out her site http://www.gettingthebestoffood.com   She shares her journey and includes a realistic attitude that accounts for all the daily struggles, stress, and obstacles that sabotage us relententlessly.  You go Dee!!!
The first time I saw this diagram was nearly a year ago and it has never left my memory. Over the past few months I have noticed how refined foods such as white bread and sugar have effected hunger throughout the day. This simple illustration shows how all highly processed foods, fats and oils look in the stomach. I’ll be right back, gotta grab an apple.OK, I’m back, less starving than I was a minute ago. If you look at all of the diets that have been successful and popular, most of them have fruits and veggies in common. Atkins, not so much because it’s an all-protein diet. The challenge that I’ve found is getting veggies to taste good. Fruits are naturally delicious without anything added, but veggies are usually better when you make them bad…like broccoli with cheese sauce, fried green beans with butter, creamed peas, spinach au gratin. At this point, I’m finding it more challenging to make veggies fun. Well, fun is a strong word. I don’t know if they’ve ever been fun. Here are some tricks I’ve learned:

  1. Bake kale with a spritz of olive oil for crispy chips with a touch of sea salt
  2. Hide spinach in smoothies, soups, baked eggs
  3. Mash sweet potatoes with a touch of cinnamon, almond milk and agave nectar and bake for fake pumpkin pie
  4. Use romaine or Boston lettuce leaves to wrap the healthy ingredients you would normally put on bread, like tuna salad, grilled chicken, lean steak
  5. Soak dates — use the water as a healthy natural sweetening liquid and puree the soaked dates with water to make a paste as a solid sweeter for recipes (paste with spaghetti squash and cinnamon is great.
Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Green Living, Guest Blog, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Cage-free versus Free-range

Thanks Marti for suggesting an explanation on this topic.

Cage-Free

Chickens laying eggs that are labeled “cage-free” are un-caged and generally have a little more space than chickens inside barns and they usually have some access to the outdoors.  This term does not tell us anything about the diet and whether they have been fed grains or given steroids or antibiotics.

Free-Range

Free-range hens aer un-caged inside barns and have outdoor access.  Once again, this label does not tell us what the birds are fed (ie/ grains, hormones, antibiotics etc)

 

So what the heck do I buy???

Look for  PASTURED EGGS—or better yet —buy from a local farmer that will share the exact diet and housing specifications of the chicken.  Remember–if the animal you eat is healthy–you will be too.

Please visit our link on the side to Simpson Family Farms that now offers delivery of their grass-fed meats and chickens!  They have great prices and I personally know and respect the owners!  They are a real class act and are wholeheartedly aimed at providing the best nutrition to people in the community!

http://www.simpsonfamilyfarms.com

Posted on by Angela in Diet, Green Living, Nutrition, Whole Food Leave a comment

Detoxify!

Posted on by Angela in Call to action, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Healthy Nuts!

Thanks to Wellness Warrior Annie for sharing this with us!

BulkCashews.jpg

A great source of nutrition, a cashew is no less a superfood than other nuts. It is extremely rich in copper,manganese, magnesium, and tryptophan, and is a good source of many other essential nutrients like protein, iron, selenium, antioxidants, and phytochemicals. One serving of organic cashews is equivalent to ¼ cup or 34.26 grams and provides:

  • 37.5% of your daily copper requirement
  • 28.4% of your daily manganese requirement
  • 28.1% of your daily tryptophan requirement
  • 25% of your daily magnesium requirement

Everyone should add cashews to their diet, as they are extremely beneficial for health. Let us look at the some of the most important health benefits of these kidney-shaped nuts:

1. Cashews help you lower your risk of heart disease

Cashews, like other nuts, are a good source of antioxidants, which various studies have shown are capable of reducing the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease. Given below is a brief description of two scientific studies that confirm their ability to improve cardiovascular health:

– Study 1

Researchers combined the evidence from four epidemiological studies – the Iowa Women’s study, Physician’s HealthStudy, Adventist Health Study, and Nurses’ Health Study – and found that:

  • Participants who ate at least four servings of nuts per week had a 37% lower chance of suffering from heart disease than subjects who did not eat nuts
  • Every additional serving of nuts over four servings per week further reduces the risk of heart disease by approximately 8%

– Study 2

Researchers who conducted the Iowa Women’s Health Study reveal that:

  • Subjects who ate one serving of nuts, such as cashews, recorded 11% fewer incidences of death from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease
  • Subjects who ate 1-4 servings of nuts recorded 19% fewer incidences of death from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease

2. Cashews promote good cardiovascular health

Cashews are rich in oleic acid, a monosaturated omega-9 fatty acid which constitutes 75% of the  total monounsaturated fats present in cashews. Monosaturated fats, in turn, accounts for 75% of the total fat content in cashews.

Studies show that monosaturated fats, such as oleic acid, promote good heart health by reducing the levels of triglycerides in the blood. High triglyceride levels are known to considerably increase the risk of heart disease.

In addition to oleic acid, cashews are extremely rich in magnesium, an essential nutrient that helps  hypertensive patients manage blood pressure. Hypertensive patients are at an increased risk of heart disease than people with normal blood pressure, and it is absolutely vital that they keep their blood pressure in check.

We provide the results of a recent study to help you better understand the anti-hypertensive capability of cashews.

– A new study shows magnesium lowers blood pressure in hypertensive patients

In a study conducted for 12 weeks, researchers gave magnesium supplements daily to the participants in one group and a placebo to other participants. At the end of the 12 weeks, researchers found that hypertensives who had received a supplement of magnesium oxide daily recorded a significant decrease in their blood pressure.

3. Cashews reduces the risk of colon cancer and health conditions caused by copper deficiency

Scientists believe that copper deficiency may be associated with increased fecal water alkaline phosphatase activity and fecal free radical production, both of which are listed as risk factors for colorectal cancer (colon cancer). Cashews have a high copper content one serving provides 37.5% of your daily copper requirement – andcan help you prevent colon cancer.

As a matter of fact, cashews are useful in the prevention of all health conditions associated with copper deficiency,such as ruptured blood vessels, osteoporosis, elevated LDL cholesterol, joint problems, anemia, and irregular heartbeat.

4. Cashews promotes healthy bones

Calcium is important for healthy bones, most of us know this. However, what many of us don’t know is that magnesium is as necessary as calcium for strong bones. Organic cashews are rich in both these minerals and are extremely beneficial for your bones.

5. Cashews prevents nerve cells from becoming over activated

Magnesium and calcium are two minerals which complement each other. Magnesium, in effect, works as a calcium channel blocker (CCB), regulating calcium’s entry into the bloodstream. In other words, a magnesium deficiency can lead to high blood calcium levels, which in turn can lead to serious health conditions such as overactive nerve cells.

Ample intake of magnesium keeps the nerve cells relaxed and obviates the risk of overactive nerve cells. Magnesium also prevents other health conditions associated with too much calcium in the bloodstream, such as heart attack and high blood pressure. In addition, regular intake of magnesium is known to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches, reduce the severity of an asthma attack, and relieve muscle tension, soreness, and fatigue.Cashews are a great source of magnesium, allowing you to easily meet your daily requirement for magnesium and enjoy the health benefits that ample intake of magnesium yields.

6. Cashews help in weight management

Contrary to popular belief, nuts lower your risk of weight gain. Although cashews, like other nuts, have high fat content, they help you in weight management, primarily because most of the fat is a good fat. They are also a good source of fiber, which, when consumed in abundance, minimizes the risk of weight gain.

A study published in the esteemed journal Obesity shows that nuts can be good for people who don’t want to gain weight. Take a look:

An independent study confirms that nuts aid weight management:

Spanish researchers conducted a study involving 8,865 participants and recorded the following observations:

  • Participants who ate two or more servings of nuts per week had a 31% less chance of putting on weight than individuals who never or seldom ate nuts
  • Among those who put on weight, participants who ate nuts at least two times a week put on less weight than participants who never or seldom ate nuts

7. Cashews prevent gallstones

According to the data collected on more than 80,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study, women who eat one ounce of nuts like cashews are 25% less likely to develop gallstones.

How many servings of cashew you must eat in a week to enjoy the health benefits it provides?

It is recommended that you consume at least 4 servings of raw organic cashews per week to enjoy the numerous health benefits that it provides.

Safety Concerns

Cashews are safe for everyone, except for those who are allergic to them or who have a certain specific conditions.Here are a few safety concerns associated with cashews:

  • Cashews interfere with other minerals such as calcium. If you are taking cashews to help you with a particular condition, speak to your doctor before eating them. This is because the intake of cashews may need to be closely monitored in such cases. Healthy people, on the other hand, do not have to worry about such things and can safely eat as many servings of cashews as they want in a week.
  • You should not have cashews if you are allergic to them. Consult your doctor immediately if you develop a food allergy after eating cashews. Common symptoms associated with food allergy include, but are not limited to, the following: skin rash, swelling of the throat, lips, or tongue, eczema, nasal congestion, wheezing, difficulty breathing, light-headedness, dizziness, diarrhea, constipation, insomnia, and fatigue.
Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, disease, Nutrition, Whole Food Leave a comment

Asthma Relief

A big shout out to a few of our dedicated followers with inquiries for natural remedies for asthma.  This is a great question and in my research, I stumbled upon Quercetin.  Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that occurs naturally in nature.  It is found in garlic, onions, and dark fruits and vegetables.  It is also found in:

Apples

Grapes

Broccoli

Green peppers

Italian squash

Tomatoes

Cayenne pepper

Black and green tea

Red wine

 

The benefits of quercetin in asthma are anti-inflammatory, remembering that asthma is inflammation of the airways.  Quercetin :  blocks antigen induced basophil/histamine release, blocks antigen induced release of leukotrienes, inhibits mast-cell degranulation and is a potent antioxidant.

Quercetin is best absorbed between meals (ie/ an apple or grapes are great snacks) and it also comes in supplement form combined with bromelain.  It is safe for kids and is distributed in chewable tabs.  As always, I recommend trying to get this great antioxidant from your food rather than a supplement.  Of course, this doesn’t replace traditional asthma treatments.

First identify and remove any triggers, keep a food diary of symptoms, reduce stress and anxiety and get plenty of rest.

During an asthma attack –it helps to breathe slowly into a paper bag as you see people do with panic attacks.  Meditation is also a great method.

If you suffer from Asthma-please consult your physician.  However, eating REAL FOOD-could possibly give you the antioxidants and anti-inflammatories that you need!

Posted on by Angela in Body, Nutrition, Whole Food Leave a comment

Wheat Woes

If you stop consuming wheat the following should happen—-

1.  Your weight will decrease

2.  Your appetite will decrease

3.  Your blood sugars will decrease

4.  You will have decreased joint pain

5.  Your C-reactive protein will drop (marker of inflammation)

6.  Your blood pressure will improve

7.  Your triglycerides and LDL (bad cholesterol) will decrease and your HDL (good cholesterol) will increase

8.   You will have less acid reflux and irritable bowel symptoms

All excerpted from Dr. William Davis’s lecture at the A4M conference  in December 2012.  Learn more at his blog

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com

Also visit my previous post Against the Grain -part 1 for more information on the dangers of modern day wheat

 

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Should Old Aquaintance Be Forgot

“Throw your hands up -they’re playing our song–Butterfly, fly away!”

Ok Wellness warriors—last night we celebrated this past year in which we have taken great strides to become better versions of ourselves!  We haven’t epically failed like the 90% of people last year that made 2012 New Year’s Resolutions to get healthy.  We have done it!

We may not have shed the pounds we hoped.  We may have cheated and had a few setbacks, but we have taken self inventory and started really thinking consciously about every single thing we put in our mouths.  We have started the lifestyle modification to eating more REAL FOOD.  And for those reasons alone, we have had a great 2012.  That being said,  let’s not set any major goals for this year other than continuing to become the best ever ourselves.  Let’s eat like cavemen and really think as a species rather that follow the food pyramids that others have dictated to us!   90% of success is driven by mindset so make sure to tune into Underground Wellness.com tomorrow for a recap of the live radio show in which Dean Dwyer discussed how to get your mind right for 2013!  Also, The Total Body Cleanse is now available at www.elkaimcleanse.com.  HAPPY NEW YEAR—It’s a party in the USA.  We forget old unhealthy habits and never bring them to mind!!!!!

Stay tuned for more Smoothie Posse recipes and testimonials!  We are starting 2013 off right!

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition, Weight Loss, Whole Food Leave a comment

Detox Cleanse

Well, it’s that time of the year when we all start making resolutions for change.  We aspire to become better people and to take better care of ourselves.  We set unrealistic goals, take an all-or-nothing approach, and most of us will epically fail within the first few months.  Weight loss, nutrition, and self-improvement are choices that we make daily, every time we open our mouths to put something into our bodies. 

Many of you have asked about cleansing and detox kits.  Don’t buy them!  Anything that is artificial or comes as a supplement or powder isn’t worth chancing.

I do think cleansing and detox can be healthy and play a good role in jump starting you into a new healthier lifestyle.  I came across a 14 day detox program that uses only real food to detox which I think is safe for most.  It also incorporates social support for the program which is where many of us fail in our New Year’s Resolutions.  You can learn more about this at http://www.yurielkaim.com/

 

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition, Whole Food 1 Comment

Going Against the Grain: Part 1

I had the fabulous opportunity to listen to Dr. William Davis speak at the World Conference on Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine.  He presented his thoughts on wheat in an incredibly logical and understandable format.  I have decided to give you my dumbed down synopsis on why WHEAT is not the healthy grain with which educators inform us.  I have to plead ignorance on this subject and am grateful to read and learn more everyday to help educate you to the dangers of our food supply.  Remember, nutrition isn’t taught in medical school!

 

Wheat dates back to the Roman Empire when grain was traded for land.  Around 850 to 900 BC , huge glacier melts raised global temperatures allowing wheat to be grown more readily.  Thus ensued the first consumption of grain by humans.  Initially, the seeds of the grain were intolerable to the human gut and caused severe diarrhea.  Therefore, the seeds had to be cooked or heated to make  human digestion possible.  This dramatically changed the culture from the hunter/gathering model to a cultivation model. Hence, birth of agriculture changed our food supply.  When we started consuming grains on a regular basis many changes happened.  The jaws and facial structures of humans decreased because of less need for mastication.  Dental decay increased.  We lost height and bone size. Also, iron deficiency was born.  So ironically, wheat started causing disease this early in the evolutionary path.  Spoiler alert—it’s only going to get worse.

This original wheat was called Eiknorn wheat that contained 14 chromosomes.  I won’t bore you with the intricate science that ensued and will refer you to the book for the specific details but this original wheat was then mated with wild grass multiple times to evolve to the 19/20th century version of wheat called Spelt which then contained 42 chromosomes.

In the 1960’s, the fear of world population explosion caused a push by the government to fund the development of high yield crops.  We then started to increase the yield of wheat crops in hopes to feed the starving population.  The wheat then underwent repetitive hybridization with other wheats and grasses to yield a crop with big seeds and heads and a much smaller stalk.  This modification allowed for a heartier plant that was much more resistant to climate changes, susceptible to fertilizers, and yielded larger seeds.  Now remember–what did the wheat seed originally do to humans? (make them sick???)

Many people say that it is unethical to not eat bread.  I mean what did Christ do at the last supper?  He broke bread–but his bread isn’t the bread we are eating today!  His bread was much closer to what God placed on this earth.  Humans have modified that original grain so dramatically that we have made ourselves ill!

Please consider reading Dr. Davis’s great book for more information.  More to come on the whole Gluten/Gluten Free issues in following posts.  He also has some great grain free ideas and recipes at his site http://www.wheatbellyblog.com

More blog posts to come as I continue to read and educate myself on the dangers of wheat.

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Nutrition, Organic, Whole Food 1 Comment

10 Fun Food Facts!

1.  Aspartame breaks down to formaldehyde in the body–yep, the same chemical we use to embalm dead bodies!

2.  The same chemical that gives tart cherries their color may relieve pain better than aspirin or ibuprofen.

3.  The term Pound Cake comes from the literal pound of butter used to make it.

4.  There are about 100,000 bacteria in 1 liter of drinking water

5.  Turmeric has anti-inflammatory properties.  Mixed with milk, it can be used as an antiseptic for the skin

6.  Two twelve ounce servings of juiced apples, pears, carrots, celery, and leafy greens has twice the potency of 1 dose of an over-the-counter laxative.

7.  1.2 billion pounds of potato chips are consumed each year in the United States.

8.  A baked potato (with skin) is a great source of dietary fiber (4 grams)

9.  A typical American eats 28 pigs in his/her lifetime.

10.  A well-done steak with charred portions contains much higher levels of carcinogens than a medium or rare steak.

Posted on by Angela in Body, Diet, Exercise, Nutrition, Whole Food Leave a comment